Browse Categories

We accept

PayPal | Visa | Mastercard | Amex | Diners Club

Newsletter

Sign up to receive our email newsletter for new releases, special offers and more!


Store Locations

We have stores in Western Australia and New South Wales.

Find stores near you

Image
Britain's First Trunk Line: The Grand Junction Railway

Webster, Norman. W.
Adams & Dart
1972
ISBN:
Pages: 196
Format: Hardcover in Dustjacket
Quantity in stock: 1

Condition:

Price: $18.00 (inc GST)

CLICK & COLLECT OPTION: Avoid postage cost!

(Option available in address screen on next page after clicking BUY NOW.)

Collect from our Fremantle Warehouse (instantly) or any Elizabeth's Bookshop (WA: 1-2 days, NSW 7-28 days).

Shipping address: Click 'Same as above'

Comments: State at which branch you would like to collect.

We will contact you as soon as your order is available to collect.

 


Ex-Library, with a discard stamp on fly leaf

The Grand Junction Railway (GJR) was an early railway company in the United Kingdom, which existed between 1833 and 1846 when it was merged into the London and North Western Railway. The line built by the company was the first trunk railway to be completed in England, and arguably the world's first long-distance railway with steam traction.

Today, the lines which made up the GJR form the central section of the West Coast Main Line.

 Authorised by Parliament in 1833 and designed by George Stephenson and Joseph Locke, the Grand Junction Railway opened for business on 4 July 1837, running for 82 miles (132 km) from Birmingham through Wolverhampton (via Perry Barr and Bescot), Stafford, Crewe, and Warrington, then via the existing Warrington and Newton Railway to join the Liverpool and Manchester Railway at a triangular junction at Newton Junction. The GJR established its chief engineering works at Crewe, moving there from Edge Hill, in Liverpool.

 Shortly after opening with a temporary Birmingham terminus at Vauxhall, services were routed to and from Curzon Street station, which it shared with the London and Birmingham Railway (LBR) whose platforms were adjacent, providing a link between Liverpool, Manchester and London. The route between Curzon Street station and Vauxhall primarily consisted of the Birmingham Viaduct. It consisted of 28 arches, each 31 feet (9.4 m) wide and 28 feet (8.5 m) tall and crossed the River Rea.

 In 1840 the GJR absorbed the Chester and Crewe Railway shortly before it opened. Seeing itself as part of a grand railway network, it encouraged the development of the North Union Railway which took the tracks onward to Preston, and it also invested in the Lancaster and Carlisle Railway and the Caledonian Railway. In 1845 the GJR merged with the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, and consolidated its position by buying the North Union Railway in association with the Manchester and Leeds Railway.

 In 1841 the company appointed Captain Mark Huish as the Secretary to the railway. Huish was ruthless in the development of the business and contributed significantly to the Company's success. pp. 197 illusts

 

 E02

 

 

Elizabeth's Bookshops have been one of Australia's premier independent book dealers since 1973. Elizabeth's family-owned business operates four branches in Perth CBD, Fremantle (WA), and Newtown (NSW). All orders are dispatched within 24 hours from our Fremantle Warehouse. All items can be viewed at Elizabeth's Bookshop Warehouse, 23 Queen Victoria Street, Fremantle WA

You might also like:

GREAT BRITISH RAILWAY, THE : A Living History      
GREAT BRITISH RAILWAY, THE : A Living History
by Tony Hall-Patch
Read more »
Australiana West Australiana Australian Art Australians at War Cook Books Art Books Childrens Books Railways & Trains Playboy Erotic Adult Fiction Gift Vouchers